Mark Wahlberg has got a very specific message for BP after the Deepwater Horizon disaster

GULF OF MEXICO - APRIL 21: Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. (Photo by U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)

Fire boats battle fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon (Picture: U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)

Mark Wahlberg’s new movie Deepwater Horizon focuses on the day in April 2010 when the rig of the same name exploded off the coast of Louisiana, and spilled 50,000 barrels of oil a day over 87 days.

The biggest environmental catastrophe of all time, British company BP and the US Department of Justice reached the largest of its kind in US history when BP agreed to pay £4.5 billion in fees – but Mark Wahlberg has now admitted that he DOESN’T want moviegoers to get angry.

http://metro.co.uk/video/mark-wahlberg-talks-bp-oil-spill-1334300/?ito=vjs-link

‘I’m a devout Catholic and I’m all about forgiveness and moving on,’ said Mark exclusively to Metro.co.uk.

‘With everyone else going on in the world today, we need a lot more love.’

However he did admit that if he could say anything to BP, he would tell them that if they had ‘spent a little more time and little bit more money, it would have saved you a lot of money in the long run.’

[metro-link url=”http://metro.co.uk/2016/09/28/mark-wahlberg-promises-something-new-and-something-different-for-transformers-fans-6158986/” title=”Mark Wahlberg promises Transformers 5 will bring ‘something new and something different’ for fans”]

[metro-fact-box title=”Deepwater Horizon ” colour=”orange” icon=”exclamation” size=”full”]

Deepwater Horizon, starring Mark Wahlberg, Kate Hudson, Dylan O’Brien and John Malkovich, is sure to get people talking about how a blockbuster film has the outright guts to take down a multi-billion dollar company.

The story of the biggest oil spill in history is told with stark realism and tense action sequences – think Captain Phillips with extra boom – but what do we know about the actual story?

Here are the incredible numbers involved in both the making of the film and the true story in which it is based on.

The real story

  • The Deepwater Horizon was 40 MILES off the Louisiana coastline
  • 126 CREW MEMBERS worked on the oil rig on the day of the incident
  • Over 50,000 BARRELS OF OIL a day spilled into the ocean, lasting 87 days
  • The searing fire took 2 DAYS to extinguish
  • In total 5 MILLION GALLONS of oil leaked into the sea
  • 11 WORKERS lost their lives in the disaster

The real set

  • To give the film an unprecedented sense of realism, a 33,000 TON RIG was constructed
  • The rig was built to 85% SCALE of the real Deepwater Horizon
  • It took 85 WELDERS eight days to build the set
  • Considered one of the biggest sets ever to be constructed, the rig  used 3 MILLION LBS of steel
  • This incredible set sat on a water tank filled with 2 MILLION GALLONS of water
  • The rig features ONE FUCTIONING HELIPAD, where an actual helicopter landed during shooting

[/metro-fact-box]

The settlement also saw BP agree to plead guilty to 14 criminal charges related to the rig explosion.

Criminal charges against three BP employees were also filed, two on manslaughter charges but they were later dismissed.

The settlement includes payments of nearly $2.4 billion to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, $350 million to the National Academy of Sciences and about $500 million to the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as pay outs to fisherman and businesses affected by the oil spill.

However BP have yet to resolve what may be the largest penalty, as the Clean Water Act can fine companies anywhere between $1,100 to $4,300 a barrel spilled – meaning BP’s fine could be as much as $21 billion.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s